KingChapman Blog

Defining and Using the Word 'Leadership'

Posted by Bob Chapman on Sep 26, 2018 8:00:00 AM

Why does it matter what the word leadership means? What difference does it make to people who are already too busy doing their “day jobs”?

That’s a great question. Let’s see if this sounds familiar:

In business organizations around the world the tempo continues to increase to the point that it seems like there is not enough time to do the basics, much less worry about leadership. Further, the magnitude of challenges in markets and the competitive landscape are accelerating. The digitization of many industries and other forms of disruptive changes is altering the landscape. Technology, which was intended to make our lives easier, seems to have made it more complicated. There are endless meetings which, if well done, produce an array of action items. The challenge is to become more disciplined and organized in order to stay on top of things, because it seems we never have enough time.

Did at least some of those statements sound familiar? I hear them all the time. When I’m listening to executives and managers say these things, I listen patiently. Then, when the other person has finished talking, I say “Yes, you have just given an excellent description of the challenges facing management”. Then I ask, “So what’s missing?” Slowly the answer turns to, “We are so busy dealing with the day-to-day that we have little time to think about growth and innovation”. For most organizations, growth and innovation will not happen naturally. It requires attention and interventions to promote change.

In short, it requires leadership.

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Topics: Leadership Accountability

Are Leadership & Management the Same?

Posted by Bob Chapman on Jul 24, 2018 8:00:00 AM

Leadership is crucial for business. Leadership is a starting point of strategy. It’s the magic elixir for achieving sustainable growth and value creation. Leadership is at the heart of engaged employees, innovation and vibrant cultures. It is what makes organizations thrive and prosper. Yet for all its importance, leadership is widely misunderstood because many people consider leadership and management to be the same. This confusion is evident as these two terms are routinely used as if they were interchangeable.

While they are both very important for a business, they are not the same. Management and leadership are different, though both are important. Most businesses will not be successful over time without the contributions of both management and leadership. But make no mistake, they are different.

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Topics: Leadership Accountability

Anyone Can Be A Leader

Posted by Larry Hoelscher on Jun 5, 2018 8:01:00 AM

By Larry G Hoelscher, Partner & Bob Chapman, PhD, Managing Partner of KingChapman

Leadership is the starting point for strategy, execution and transformation. Building a cadre or core of leaders is a critical success factor. Yet too often leadership is thought to be exercised only by executives and a few other chosen individuals. We say that is not only wrong, but it robs organizations of a most precious resource for executing strategic change and transformation. How then does this mistake keep occurring? 

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Topics: Strategic Execution, Leadership Accountability

Fingerprints of Organizational Transformation

Posted by Bob Chapman on May 29, 2018 8:00:00 AM

I frequently hear the question, “How do I know that we are doing the right things to execute our growth strategies and transform our organization?” What a great question! To have the insight to craft such a question, one has to be aware that executing strategies and transforming organizations requires something “out of the ordinary”. Success in creating value through growth strategies and transformation requires an exceptional approach. Simply doing more of the same is unlikely to be successful, so something out of the ordinary is required. This level of change requires strong leadership. It will not happen simply through good management. Strong leadership must be actively involved.

This brings us to the question of “how do I know we are doing the right things?”

The answers center around:

* “Are you being a leader?”

* “Can your leadership fingerprints be seen on the execution actions and change efforts?”

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Topics: Organizational Culture, Leadership Accountability

How the Tangram Became Our Metaphor for Transformation

Posted by Larry Hoelscher on Mar 20, 2018 5:44:41 PM

We were blown away – so simple and yet so . . . perfect!

When we began working with Neos Marketing, we posed a simple request – is there a way to demonstrate “transformation”, either visually or physically? Neos took up the challenge. And the result was brilliant!

First – a brief definition for transformation (from Webster’s Dictionary):

transform, v.

Etymology: < Latin transformāre, < trans- prefix + formāre to form, < forma form. Compare French transformer (14th cent. in Godefroy Compl.), also Old French tresformer

1. a. trans. To change the form of; to change into another shape or form; to metamorphose. 

b.transf. To change in character or condition; to alter in function or nature.

2. intr. To undergo a change of form or nature; to change.

1. The action of transforming or fact of being transformed.

a. The action of changing in form, shape, or appearance; metamorphosis.

b. A changed form; a person or thing transformed.

2. transf. A complete change in character, condition, etc.

 So how we can show people a visual representation of that? By using a metaphor.

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Topics: Organizational Culture, Leadership Accountability

Transformation Demands Developing Leadership Accountability

Posted by Bob Chapman on Oct 24, 2017 12:35:15 PM

 
Accountability, leadership and transformation are inexorably linked. Accountability is an acute and overt manifestation of leadership. Leadership involves accepting and acting on the accountabilities of the position. Transformation will not occur without leadership. One of the first aspects of a business that needs to be transformed is accountability. Among the strongest evidence that a business is transforming is that the executives, managers and employees have a new relationship to accountability, and this new relationship to accountability is manifested in the performance of the business, relationships with stakeholders, and service provided to customers.

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Topics: Leadership Accountability

Empowering Accountability Occurs in Action

Posted by Bob Chapman on May 24, 2017 2:31:45 PM

Empowering Accountability first and foremost occurs in the overt actions of leaders, such as communication. Other equally important actions include quality of strategic thinking, planning, design of strategic initiatives, sustaining execution during hard times, learning from experiences, and sustaining momentum until desired results are achieved. All of these actions are part of what is required to be a leader in a complex world.

Often, I am asked, “How can I see accountability in my organization”? The answer to seeing actual accountability in your organization is watching the action. That is, the manifestation of accountability is action. Actions shine a bright light on executives and managers being accountable, or the lack thereof. The effectiveness of your organization is determined by the degree to which your leaders hold themselves to account for their actions, communications, and results.

Executives must act from being accountable for all the results, not just the ones they like or those that make them look good. Leaders' actions must include communication about decisions made and intended results from these decisions and actions. Employees pay very close attention to executives’ and managers’ actions and non-actions, what is talked about and what is ignored, what is rewarded and punished, and the support given for those in the organization who step out and try to lead.

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Topics: Leadership Accountability

Avoiding Blame, Excuses and Scapegoating in Leadership Accountability

Posted by Bob Chapman on May 10, 2017 3:03:14 PM

Leading in a complex world requires continued development of leadership attributes and tools.

An excellent example of this is when accountability is created in the context of leadership, rather than management. Leaders use accountability to empower, while managers use it to control. This is entirely consistent with the differences in management and leadership.

In many organizations creating leadership accountability this is easier said than done, since there is such strong presence of management orientation and little leadership orientation. John Kotter once wrote, “Most U.S. corporations today are overmanaged and underled”. In companies which are 'overmanaged', accountability will be designed to produce consistency, control and order. In contrast, accountability in leadership context is designed to align, communicate, engage, motivate and inspire.

Leadership accountability is a primary tool of executives to successfully achieve strategic growth. Executing growth strategies involves implementing substantial change, which in turn requires leadership. While leadership accountability provides a powerful leverage for growth, it can lose its power if the executives and senior managers fall into common organizational traps. These traps can in ensnarl even the most committed, experienced and intelligent executive.

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Topics: Leadership Accountability

‘The Jolt Factor’ Effect on Organizations in M&A Integrations

Posted by Larry Hoelscher on May 2, 2017 10:42:07 AM

Having been a part of many integrations of mergers and acquisitions with different clients, we have observed numerous issues that predictably arise. These issues affect the integration project leaders, the integration teams and ultimately a broader group of employees. While there was great effort in the pursuit of an M&A deal, some of the effects of these efforts on everyone else in the organization often go unnoticed.

The Chase Begins

There are predictable dynamics that will happen as the “chase begins”. As an example, rarely do the M&A integrations go as scheduled. Rather, there is a continual speeding up and then slowing down of the process. A visual analogy to this phenomenon is what happens when a train with a heavy load of cars begins to move. There is often lurching back and forth.

This phenomenon of speeding up and slowing down is due to several factors:

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Topics: Leadership Accountability

Change Leadership: Why is Change So Hard, Even When You Want to?

Posted by Larry Hoelscher on Mar 28, 2017 7:02:00 AM


Quite a few years ago, I was hitting golf balls with my 5-iron, when Kelly, my golf instructor, asked “Larry, what do you want to get out of your lesson today?” I told him of my frustration of hitting a short 150 yard slice (ugly) and I want to hit a 175 yard shot with a slight draw (beautiful!). 
After hitting a few balls, Kelly showed me a “strong grip” – which is not about how firm to hold the club, but rather the location of the hands on the club.

I tried hitting the ball using this new grip, and I swear, I could hardly get the club face on the ball. After a number of tries, I turned and looked at Kelly and said in frustration, “Kelly, I can’t hit the ball this way. It just feels too strange. Let me go back to my old grip and show me something else!”

I will never forget the look on Kelly’s face. He said, “But Larry, it is SUPPOSED TO FEEL STRANGE! If it doesn’t feel strange, then there is no change, and if you don’t change, you will never hit a 5-iron 175 yards with a slight draw!”

What a lesson! Yes, I can still hit that shot, but that’s really not the point. The biggest lesson for me was, how change can be so difficult, even when I wanted to result of the change! Here I was, a relatively inexperienced golfer, wanting to become a much better golfer, and yet, making the change was so challenging.

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Topics: Organizational Culture, Leadership Accountability